A Tribute to Eddie Milner

Edward James Milner - Born May 21, 1955, Columbus, Ohio

Professional Debut - September 2, 1980

Major League Career Highlights - Stole 145 bases in career, 41 in 1983. In 1986 hit 15 homeruns and had a 20 game hitting streak.

TCBA History

1983 - Drafted by the New Oxford Lions for 8K. When pressed for the reason Eddie was drafted the answer might be because he was on the Reds. Research wasn't exactly an art practiced by everyone in those days. Eddie finished his rookie season with a .255 batting average. He hit 9 triples and scored 67 runs in 138 games as the Lions' right fielder. He helped Fernando Valenzuela in his second no-hitter by going 5 for 6 with a walk as the Lions beat Southern California 16-0. Later in the season, he went 2 for 4 and scored 3 runs in Valenzuela's 6-0 no-hitter against Heidelberg. He hit .328 over the season's final 49 games.

1984 - After getting himself established in his rookie year, Eddie solidified his spot on the team by playing in 158 games and posting a .256 batting average. He stole 50 bases to lead the team and poked 9 homeruns. Eddie was 2nd on the team with 9 game winning hits. His average dropped 8 points during the final series of the year; a disappointing 3 for 30 performance against Irishtown.

1985 - This was a year to forget. Eddie lost his right field job to Andre Dawson (how he got out of New Oxford is another story) and appeared only as a pinch runner or defensive replacement for Mel Hall. He hit .145 on the year with 1 homerun in 48 at bats.

1986 - It took a stupid trade and an injury to Mel Hall, but Eddie got his right field job back. He posted numbers similar to 1983 and 1984, but it appeared that he was just going to be a punch and judy, Mike Felder type of hitter. Eddie batted .262 on the year but did reach personal highs in runs scored with 98 and walks with 64. His 47 stolen bases were just 3 off his career high. He hit .282 against Capital Divison opponents.

1987 - Eddie had his best year in the Majors in 1986, so he was expected to have his best TCBA season in 1987 (which he did). But he also was busted for cocaine in the offseason, so perhaps this would be his last shot with the Lions. Dave Branagan thought he'd be funny and sent Eddie's APBA card enclosed in a plastic bag containing white powder. Very funny!

Eddie's APBA card was featured on the cover of the Series 1 TCBA Report.

It was an awesome year for Mr. Milner. He batted .298, had 35 doubles, 12 triples and 14 homeruns which resulted in a .512 slugging percentage (second on the team). Eddie's style of play fit well with the Lions hit and run style offense. The Lions won the Capital Division with a 92-70 mark, a joke by TCBA 100+ win standards.

In the playoffs, Eddie starred against Cooperstown. He was 12 for 21 with 3 homeruns as the Lions advanced 4-3. His 3rd homerun was key as it topped off a 5 run first inning in game 7! Eddie was named series MVP.

On to face Red Hill, who had earned a first round bye. Eddie again led the Lions by going 8 for 18 with 2 homeruns as he and Bo Diaz hit back to back homeruns to win game 5, 4-3. New Oxford won the series 4-2. Eddie again took series MVP.

The final step to the NL Championship was to beat the Northboro Crusaders. The wise Crusader pitchers avoided giving Eddie anything good to hit and held him to a 1 for 11 series. But Lion pitchers held Northboro to 9 runs in 5 games as the Lions advanced to the World Series 4 games to 1.

Eddie and the boys brought home the final victory, a 4-2 series win over Jim McEneaney's Long Islanders. The series atmosphere was so loud that the hotel's front desk received complaints about the noise.

1988 - Well, obviously the white powder affected Eddie to the point where his performance dropped him into a part-time role. In the majors Eddie was traded to the San Francisco Giants and that was basically the end. He hit .278 with the Lions but his power was gone, hitting just 3 homeruns in 287 at bats. He only stole 5 bases and was just a shell of his former self. The Lions were also a shell of their former selves, falling from league champs to a pitifull 67-95 mark. The trades made during the off season would start a reverse trend where Lion management took a very conservative stance when it came to making trades.

1989 - Eddie was released in the off season and the Lions fell to a 48-112 record. While that mark seems almost unbearable, the team would rebound the next year to a 98 win season and not make the playoffs. Only in the TCBA.

 

The Present - Eddie keeps himself busy making predictions and trying to have a few laughs along the way. There are those who still cringe at the sound of the name Eddie Milner as memories of superb clutch performances play through their minds.

Career Stats

YR
AVG
G
AB
R
H
D
T
HR
RBI
BB
SO
SB
CS
SLG
OBP
1983
.255
138
462
67
118
29
9
3
55
39
33
6
3
.377
.313
1984
.256
158
575
75
147
24
5
9
67
61
68
50
17
.362
.327
1985
.145
80
48
12
7
0
0
1
5
5
9
3
2
.208
.226
1986
.262
149
521
98
137
20
4
7
48
64
57
47
11
.357
.343
1987
.298
150
465
80
139
35
12
14
51
45
64
14
7
.516
.360
1988
.278
102
287
38
80
21
0
3
35
21
46
5
3
.383
.327
Total
.266
777
2358
370
628
129
30
37
271
235
267
125
43
.394
.333

Eddie Milner after baseball:

http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archives?p_product=DDNB&p_theme=ddnb&p_action=search&p_maxdocs=200&p_topdoc=1&p_text_direct-0=0F504FCCE94B831E&p_field_direct-0=document_id&p_perpage=10&p_sort=YMD_date:D&s_trackval=GooglePM

http://www.enquirer.com/editions/1998/09/10/loc_milner10.html